An overview of some of our route.

http://www.sanoodi.com/routes/new-ross-2-dungarvan-71614/widgets/map/

We’re using a new service provided by Sanoodi to map our route and share our adventure around the world.  Our Blackberry is loaded with their excellent Smap software which, when activated, uploads our route directly to the Sanoodi site. It provides us with lots of interesting info on average speeds, elevation etc. The route above is Tuesday’s progress.

For more see our page at Sanoodi.com

Advertisements

it begins


simon

What a day!! For the last few years I’ve imagined how it would feel to begin cycling around the world. Would I feel sad about leaving my family and friends? Happy to begin an amazing adventure? Scared about all the dangers that lie ahead? Well, so far I’ve felt the first two, often switching emotions in a split second. When we rolled down from the Happy Pear I was elated, then immediately burst into tears.

Things settled down though once I got into the cycle to Wicklow where spent the first night of our expedition, overlooking the sea. We swiftly set up camp and set into cooking some grub, chopping veg and chorizo sausage for a good oul broth. As Ferg went to light the stove he burst into laughter. With all the fancy satellite phones, clothing and multifuel stoves, we had forgotten to bring the matches!

The following day began following the gorgeous coast road past Brittas Bay, through Enniscorthy then to New Ross, 105km down the road. The bikes felt good despite carrying so much weight, although my bum was a bit sore as I haven’t been on a bike since September!

After a chilly start in New Ross, we pedalled through the rolling Wexford hills past road works and barking dogs to the charming coastal town of Dungarvan. We’re about to get a big feed to satisfy our hunger after another day of pedalling, excellent.

Simons tune of the day – The Killers – Indie Rock and Roll

Fearghals tune of the day – LCD sound system – Get Innocuous

Day 1 – Distance 75km; average speed 20km/h; max speed 30km/h
Day 2 – Distance 105km; average speed 21km/h; max speed 40km/h
Day 3 – Distance 74km; average speed 22.7km/h; max speed 55km/h

First Leg

*Fearghal*

What a send off!!!!!!!!

200 cyclists dragged themselves out of their beds on Sunday morning to join
us for the 25km cycle from Blackrock to Greystones to give us what can only
be described as a royal send off. The weather suited the mood, we were lucky
to have a brisk crisp and sunny November morning, everyone seemed to be in
great spirits and there was a real buzz when we arrived at The Happy Pear in
Greystones.

I have to admit that when it was time to go it was hard not to get emotional
when faced with a sea of well wishers and as I rolled down Greystones Main
St my shades hid the source of the two salty tracks running down my cheeks.

The event raised roughly 5 and a half grand(money is still coming in) for
Aware.

It wouldn’t have been possible without the help of some key people. So a
massive thanks to;

Mike from the Cycle Inn.
Alan Dunne who dutifully drove the pace van.
Alan McGinty and the Rock community who donated their premises for the
morning.
Christy McDaid and all of the Willow Wheelers who were out in force.
The Gardai from Bray and Blackrock.
Sinead and the Rockingham drummers who provided just the right beat.
Dave and Steve and all of the staff from The Happy Pear for baking such
great brownies for all of the hungry cyclists .

THANKS FOR MAKING THE FIRST LEG SUCH A SUCCESS : )

Dreams of Leaving

Fearghal

     

Its funny, I’ve thought about this blog post many times over the last two years. I thought about different ways of expressing the feeling of standing on the precipice and counting down to jumping into the big world. I thought that I might pop in a quote or two something to give a bit of gravitas, someone one else famous, who’s words that might capture this strange feeling better than I ever could.

A line from “Philadelphia Here I Come” that describes how Gar feels on the eve of his departure to America was apt I thought. It portrays how he watches madge, his surrogate mother, walk up the stairs for the last time and “keeps the camera running”, as the scene would be edited many times over the years until what’s left is pure gold. Many of those scenes have been recorded in the last week or so. So many goodbyes- hugs and pats on the back, and “take care now”s. All pure gold already, stored and filed in the vault to be re-played as snippets and provide comfort a reminder of my life.

The truth is though, its been such a hectic week, with lots of media engagements including a spot on the Six One News and Morning Ireland. That I haven’t had time to indulge feelings. Unfortunately, or perhaps fortunately, there hasn’t been space for introspection. Instead, there has been a constant check list of “things to do”- people to talk to and emails to be sent.

It hasn’t been helped by a few unavoidable delay of some pretty important kit which will hopefully meet us en route over the next week. 

I suspect, that the true sensation of embarking will only make itself felt after jumping headlong into the big wide world. That the full magnitude of our undertaking will be present only when we set off- that only when I feel the rush of air against my cheeks will I know what its like to actually jump. 

For the moment however, there’s still so much to do…..